Keelakoil Pathu

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Keelakoil Pathu

village

Country
 India

State
Tamil Nadu

District
Thanjavur

Population (2001)

 • Total
2,596

Languages

 • Official
Tamil

Time zone
IST (UTC+5:30)

Keelakoil Pathu is a village in the Papanasam taluk of Thanjavur district, Tamil Nadu, India.
Demographics[edit]
As per the 2001 census, Keelakoil Pathu had a total population of 2596 with 1290 males and 1306 females. The sex ratio was 1012. The literacy rate was 67.72.
References[edit]

“Primary Census Abstract – Census 2001”. Directorate of Census Operations-Tamil Nadu. 

This Thanjavur district location article is a stub. You can help Wikipedia by expanding it.

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The Disposable American

The Disposable American: Layoffs and Their Consequences

Author
Louis Uchitelle

Language
English

Published
2006 (Alfred A. Knopf)

The Disposable American: Layoffs and Their Consequences is a 2006 book written by New York Times reporter Louis Uchitelle, and it is his first. It is published by Alfred A. Knopf, Inc. The book is concerned with the far reaching layoffs occurring in the United States, the damage he perceives this causes the country, and the psychological harm he perceives dealt to workers by this phenomenon.[1][2][3][4] According to the book’s author, Louis Uchitelle, the waves of major layoffs are injurious to the United States in three key areas: the phenomenon disadvantages companies leaving them unable to compete, it has removed numerous middle class jobs, and it disadvantages former middle class workers who are often forced to work lower paying jobs.[2][3]
References[edit]

^ Lardner, James (2007-06-14). “The Specter Haunting Your Office” (Free PDF download). The New York Review of Books. New York City. 54 (10): 1–11. Retrieved 2013-12-01. 
^ a b Delong, Brad (2006-04-02). “Americans Idle – ‘The Disposable American: Layoffs and Their Consequences,’ by Louis Uchitelle”. The New York Times. p. 01. Retrieved 2013-12-01. 
^ a b Geoghegan, Thomas; ‘The Disposable American’ (March 29, 2006). “How Pink Slips Hurt More Than Workers”. Books of The Times. New York City: The New York Times. Retrieved 2013-12-01. 
^ Mentzer, Marc S. (2006-11-01). “The Disposable American: Layoffs and Their Consequences by Louis Uchitelle”. Academy of Management Perspectives. 20 (4): 123–124. doi:10.5465/AMP.2006.23270316. JSTOR 4166279. 

Further reading[edit]

Gerena, Charles (Spring 2007). “Job Security No Longer Job One”. Region Focus. Book Review: ‘The Disposable American: Layoffs and Their Consequences – by Louis Uchitelle’. Free PDF download.
Sharone, Ofer (2007). “The Disposable American: Layoffs and Their Consequences – by Louis Uchitelle”. Sociological Inquiry. 77 (3): 514. doi:10.1111/j.1475-682X.2007.00203.x. 

External links[edit]

“Book Discussion on The Disposable American: Layoffs and Their Consequences”. C-SPAN. Video. August 17, 2006.

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Gyron

This article is about the heraldic element. For the jet engine, see de Havilland Gyron.

Example of a gyron

Gyronny of eight or and sable

A gyron is a triangular heraldic ordinary having an angle at the fess point and the opposite side at the edge of the escutcheon. A shield divided into gyrons is called gyronny, the default is typically of eight if no number of gyrons is specified. The word gyron is derived from Old French giron, meaning ‘gusset’.[1] Another term for a single gyron is esquire.[2]
The gyron rarely appears singly, but as a variation of the field, gyronny coats appear frequently. These most often appear as eight roughly equal parts, but occasionally a coat gyronny of six, ten, twelve or more parts may be specified.[3]
References[edit]

^ “Gyron”. Concise Oxford English Dictionary (11th ed.). Oxford: University Press. 2008. ISBN 9780199548415. 
^ Friar, Stephen, ed. (1987). A New Dictionary of Heraldry. London: Alphabooks/A&C Black. p. 139. ISBN 0 906670 44 6. 
^ Fox-Davies, Arthur Charles (1909). A Complete Guide to Heraldry. New York: Dodge Publishing Co. p. 137. 

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Heraldry

Authorities

Law of heraldic arms
Grant of arms

See also
Bartolus de Saxoferrato
Officers of arms in the United Kingdom (King of Arms, Herald, Pursuivant)
Private Officer of Arms

Types of coats of arms

Burgher arms
Civic heraldry
Ecclesiastical heraldry
Canting arms
Attributed arms

Blazons

Argent
Or
Charge
Divisions
Field
Lines
Ordinary
Tincture
Bar
Bend
Bordure
Canton
Chevron
Chief
Cross
Fess
Flaunch
Gyron
Lozenge
Orle
Pall
Pale
Roundel
Saltire

Marshalling

Quartering
Impalement

Achievements

Cadency
Crest
Compartment
Helmet
Mantling
Motto
Shield
Supporter
Torse

Related

Armiger
List of oldest heraldry
Augmentation of honour
Heraldic flag (Banner of arms)
Heraldic badge
Socialist heraldry
Vexillology
Portal:Heraldry/Web resources

Heraldry portal

This heraldry-related article is a stub. You can help Wikipedia by expanding it.

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서양야동

GRB 060729

GRB 060729

Event type
Gamma-ray burst

Observation

Date
29 July 2006

Location

Constellation
Pictor

Right ascension
06h 21m 31.850s

Declination
−62° 22′ 12.69″

Epoch
J2000

Redshift
0.54±0.01

Characteristics

Energetics

See also

[edit on Wikidata]

GRB 060729 was a gamma-ray burst that was first observed on 29 July 2006. It is likely the signal of a type Ic supernova—the core collapse of a massive star.[1] It was also notable for its extraordinarily long X-ray afterglow, detectable 642 days (nearly two years) after the original event.[2] The event was remote, with a redshift of 0.54.[1]
References[edit]

Citations

^ a b Cano et al. 2011.
^ Grupe et al. 2010.

Sources

Cano, Z.; et al. (2011). “A Tale of Two GRB-SNe at a Common Redshift of z=0.54”. Monthly Notices of the Royal Astronomical Society. 413 (1): 669–85. arXiv:1012.1466. Bibcode:2011MNRAS.413..669C. doi:10.1111/j.1365-2966.2010.18164.x. 
Grupe, D.; et al. (2010). “Late-Time Detections of the X-Ray Afterglow of GRB 060729 with Chandra—The Latest Detections Ever of an X-Ray Afterglow”. The Astrophysical Journal. 711 (2): 1008–1016. arXiv:0903.1258. Bibcode:2010ApJ…711.1008G. doi:10.1088/0004-637X/711/2/1008. 

The Crossing (Star Trek: Enterprise)

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“The Crossing”

Star Trek: Enterprise episode

A possessed Tucker

Episode no.
Season 2
Episode 18

Directed by
David Livingston

Story by
Rick Berman
Brannon Braga
André Bormanis

Teleplay by
Rick Berman
Brannon Braga

Featured music
Paul Baillargeon

Production code
218

Original air date
April 2, 2003 (2003-04-02)

Guest appearance(s)

Joseph Will – Crewman Michael Rostov
Steven Allerick – Ensign Cook
Alexander Chance – Crewman #1
Matthew Kiminsky – Crewman Cunningham
Valarie Ianniello – Female Crewmember

Episode chronology

← Previous
“Canamar”
Next →
“Judgment”

List of Star Trek: Enterprise episodes

“The Crossing” is the forty-fourth episode of the television series Star Trek: Enterprise, the eighteenth of the second season.
Non-corporeal aliens attempt to take over the Earth starship Enterprise.
Plot[edit]
While at warp speed, a huge alien vessel overtakes and swallows Enterprise, disabling the ship’s engines and weapons. When the scanners register neither the alien ship nor its numerous energy-wisp-like non-corporeal beings, Captain Archer takes Lieutenant Reed and Commander Tucker on an away mission to the interior. While EV Tucker is visibly “entered” by one of the beings before being returned to his normal state. Doctor Phlox’s examination, however, reveals no lingering effects.
Later, Tucker is possessed again, and is soon located in the mess hall enjoying the simple pleasures of food. When asked, the alien says that they are explorers who merely want to experience the tangible nature of the corporeal state they long evolved from. In exchange, the crew would be permitted to have out of body experiences. Archer, dou
서양야동

Jubilate Group

The Jubilate Group

Founded
1980

Founder
Michael Baughen

Country of origin
United Kingdom

Headquarters location
Torquay, Devon, England

Official website
www.jubilate.co.uk

The Jubilate Group is a Christian publishing house, which administers copyright for more than sixty composers and writers. The group was founded by Michael Baughen in the 1960s. The group’s first production was Youth Praise. In 1982, Jubilate published Hymns for Today’s Church, one of the first hymn books with completely modernised language. In 1999, Sing Glory, Jubilate’s most recent major hymn book, was published.

Contents

1 Chairmen of Jubilate
2 History

2.1 Founding
2.2 In the United States
2.3 Later work

3 Styles of work
4 Makeup and functions
5 Board of directors
6 References
7 External links

Chairmen of Jubilate[edit]

Name
Dates

Michael Baughen
1980 to 1999

Michael Saward
1999 to 2001

Steve James
2001 to 2014 (?)

Noel Tredinnick
2014 (?) to present

History[edit]
Founding[edit]
In the early 1960s, the Reverend Michael Baughen (who later became Anglican Bishop of Chester) was concerned about the declining popularity of traditional hymns, and brought together a few friends to see what might be done about it. Some were composers, others lyricists. Over a long period this group worked together and wrote a collection of 150 new songs, entitled Youth Praise. The Church Pastoral Aid Society (a long-established English home missionary society) accepted Youth Praise and, in March 1966, published it. Within a short time it became a best-seller among its kind. Three years later the CPAS published Youth Praise 2.
By 1966 the central group comprised Michael Baughen, Richard Bewes, Christopher Collins, Christopher Idle, Edward Shirras, Michael Saward, James Seddon, Norman Warren, David Wilson and Michael Perry.
In 1980, the group became a limited liability company with the title Jubilate Hymns Ltd.[1]
In the United States[edit]
George Shorney of Hope Publishing in Carol Stream, Illinois, enlisted the independent cooperation, first of Timothy Dudley-Smith and then of the extended group. As a result of his effort The Jubilate Group and its works have found their way into the American hymnals Worship, Rejoice in the Lord, The Hymnal 1982, Psalter Hymnal, The Worshiping Church, The Baptist Hymnal, Christian Worship, Trinity Hymnal and others. Similarly, many American hymns have emerged in Jubilate Group publications.
Later work[edit]
The Jubilate Group considered
한국야동

Carrollton High School

Carrollton High School may refer to:

Carrollton High School (Carrollton, Georgia) — Carrollton, Georgia
Carrollton High School (Carrollton, Kentucky) — Carrollton, Kentucky
Carrollton High School (Carrollton, Illinois) — Carrollton, Illinois
Carrollton High School (Carrollton, Michigan) — Carrollton, Michigan
Carrollton High School (Carrollton, Ohio) — Carrollton, Ohio
Carrollton High School (Texas) — Carrollton, Texas
Carrollton Area Career Center — Carrollton, Missouri
West Carrollton High School — West Carrollton, Ohio

This disambiguation page lists articles about schools, colleges, or other educational institutions which are associated with the same title. If an internal link led you here, you may wish to change the link to point directly to the intended article.

Cosmic Anisotropy Telescope

Cosmic Anisotropy Telescope

Coordinates
52°09′58″N 0°02′02″E / 52.166°N 0.034°E / 52.166; 0.034Coordinates: 52°09′58″N 0°02′02″E / 52.166°N 0.034°E / 52.166; 0.034

Telescope style
radio telescope

Related media on Wikimedia Commons

[edit on Wikidata]

The Cosmic Anisotropy Telescope (CAT) was a three-element interferometer for cosmic microwave background radiation (CMB/R) observations at 13 to 17 GHz, based at the Mullard Radio Astronomy Observatory. In 1995, it was the first instrument to measure small-scale structure in the cosmic microwave background. When the more sensitive Very Small Array came online, the CAT telescope was decommissioned in a ceremonial bonfire.
External links[edit]

Cosmic Anisotropy Telescope (CAT) online
The first detection of small-scale structure in the cosmic microwave background
Press release from 1995 describing first measurements of small-scale structure in the cosmic microwave background
The CAT enclosure on Google Maps

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Cosmic microwave background radiation (CMB)

Discovery of CMB radiation
Timeline of CMB astronomy

Effects

Cosmic variance
Diffusion damping
Recombination
Sachs–Wolfe effect
Sunyaev–Zel’dovich effect
Thomson scattering

9-year WMAP image (2012) of the CMB.

Experiments

Space

COBE
Planck
RELIKT-1
WMAP

Balloon

Archeops
ARCADE
BOOMERanG
EBEX
MAXIMA
QMAP
Spider
TopHat

Ground

ABS
ACBAR
ACT
AMI
AMiBA
APEX
ATCA
BICEP
BICEP2
BICEP3
BIMA
CAPMAP
CAT
CBI
CLASS
COSMOSOMAS
DASI
Keck Array
MAT
OVRO
POLARBEAR
QUaD
QUBIC
QUIET
QUIJOTE
Saskatoon
SPT
SZA
Tenerife
VSA

Coordinates: 52°09′58″N 0°02′02″E / 52.166°N 0.034°E / 52.166; 0.034

This article about a specific observatory, telescope or astronomical instrument is a stub. You can help Wikipedia by expanding it.

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